Tuesday, October 6, 2009

They actually reccomend suppliments now !


There is an ingrained belief in some sectors/groups/families/individuals that supplementation is not needed. It is clearly has an emotional connection, because these people seem to become slightly irrational when they encounter the message that we need to supplement.

I put it down to the underling issue - that if I accept that I need to supplement - it means I have not looking after myself/my partner/my family properly and that I have failed to feed them a healthy meals. To me it must be something like this otherwise people would not be so irrational in denying the need to supplement.

More and more evidence is pointing to supplementation as being important. For instance of the top of my head:
  • Iodine in salt. We do not get enough iodine in our diet, hence iodine is added to salt to stop us getting goutier. Thus we are indirectly supplementing.
  • Iron is often taken as a supplement by women, often recommended by a doctor. Especially when they are pregnant.
  • Folic acid is highly recommended to be supplemented before and during pregnancy. This is because we don't get enough folic acid/folate in our diet to reduce risk of neural tube birth defects.
Well it turns out that we can now add vitamin D to the list of things the medical profession are telling us to supplement with. A paper has come out that states that:
Vitamin D deficiency is widespread among women with breast cancer. Guidelines currently recommend daily supplementation with 400 IU vitamin D3; however, attainment of a circulating level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D defined as sufficient (that is, greater than or equal to75 nmol/l) might not be possible with this level of supplementation,
So if you have breast cancer you have low vitamin D levels and you need to suppliment them to . I wonder if this is causative, does the low vitamin D level cause cancer, or does cancer cause low vitamin D levels?

Reference: Bruce W. Hollis Nutrition: US recommendations fail to correct vitamin D deficiency. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2009 p534 | doi:10.1038/nrendo.2009.178

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